In a short interview with ABC News, Apple CEO Tim Cook shared some interesting information about the new battery features the company planned to offer to iPhone users in a future iOS update.

As you may be aware, Apple introduced last year a hidden “feature” that would stop older iPhone devices with degraded batteries to suddenly shut down during certain conditions, such as when you were outside in the cold, and the battery had a low charge.

The so-called power management feature was first implemented with the iOS 10.2.1 update last year for iPhone 6 and iPhone 6s devices, and expanded a year later to the iPhone 7 models with the iOS 11.2 software update, though Apple wasn’t transparent about it.

When iPhone users found out Apple was intentionally slowing down their devices to prevent them from shutting down unexpectedly because the battery was degraded, they sued the company. Apple immediately apologized for the misunderstanding.

The company publicly announced a discounted $29 battery replacement program throughout 2018 for iPhone 6, 6 Plus, 6s, 6s Plus, 7, 7 Plus, and SE models, and promised to introduce new battery management features with the next iOS software update.

You’ll be able to turn performance throttling off, says Tim Cook

In the ABC News interview with Rebecca Jarvis, Tim Cook said the next update to the iOS 11 operating system would allow users to disable the power management feature that affects the performance of the device.

“We’re going to give people the visibility of the health of their battery. So it’s very, very transparent,” says Tim Cook in the interview, noting the fact that the change will be implemented in the next iOS 11 developer release.

“We’re going to give people the visibility of the health of their battery. So it’s very, very transparent,” says Tim Cook in the interview, noting the fact that the change will be implemented in the next iOS 11 developer release that’s coming after the soon-to-be-released iOS 11.2.5 software update.

“We will tell someone we’re reducing your performance by some amount in order to not have an unexpected restart,” he added. “And if you don’t want it, you can turn it off. Now we don’t recommend it, because we think people’s iPhones are really important to them.”

Giving users transparency about certain features of their iPhone devices is very important. We believe people should be able to choose if they want to disable or enable any battery management feature, or any other feature for that matter.

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